Trip Report

Astana, Kazakhstan Birders Turanga Forest Birding at Cosmo Station  Tien Shen Mountains Black-bellied Sandgrouse-(m) Taukum Desert Black-Lark- (m)  Korgalzhyn, KZ Blue-capped Redstart Tien Shen Mountains, KZ Bukhara, Uzbekistan Bukhara, Uzbekistan Bukhara, Uzbekistan Eurasian Hoopoe Kopa Road, KZ European Roller Taukum Desert, KZ Primula Tien Shen Mountains, KZ Samarkand, Uzbekistan Samarkand, Uzbekistan Wildflowers Chimgan Hills, UZ
  • Astana, Kazakhstan
  • Birders Turanga Forest
  • Birding at Cosmo Station  Tien Shen Mountains
  • Black-bellied Sandgrouse-(m) Taukum Desert
  • Black-Lark- (m)  Korgalzhyn, KZ
  • Blue-capped Redstart Tien Shen Mountains, KZ
  • Bukhara, Uzbekistan
  • Bukhara, Uzbekistan
  • Bukhara, Uzbekistan
  • Eurasian Hoopoe Kopa Road, KZ
  • European Roller Taukum Desert, KZ
  • Primula Tien Shen Mountains, KZ
  • Samarkand, Uzbekistan
  • Samarkand, Uzbekistan
  • Wildflowers Chimgan Hills, UZ

 



Kazakhstan June 1-20, 2018

 

 

May 31                Astana, Kazakhstan
Astana is a long way from almost anywhere and it’s exhausting to get here, but we all got here safely and found our way to the hotel. After a brief rest we explored the local area to have a good walk, as well as see what birds were in the plantings around the city. Astana is a very new city, barely 20 years old, so many of the trees and city plantings are years away from maturity. The wind was howling (as normal) which made for difficult observation, so our birdlist was short for the time outside, but we did get about 5 miles of walking under our belt  and got those airline kinks out of our system. Highlights included 3 Great Crested Grebes and a very obliging pair of Fieldfares.

 

June 1                  Astana and local wetlands
The King Hotel has a pretty good breakfast buffet with plenty of vegetables and salads so we had a good healthy start to the day. After meeting Sasha, our local guide, and Molly, our translator, we headed out of the city to do our first real birding of the trip. A roadside stop produced Booted Warbler, Lesser and Common Whitethroat and, with some perseverance, some great views of our target bird- the striking Pine Bunting. The scenery got more and more “steppe-like” as we drove away from town, and this was accentuated by a large herd of horses making the image even more evocative of Kazakhstan. A couple of Steppe Marmots seemed to be the same color as the dry soil and some lovely Yellow Wagtails of the “beema” subspecies showed off very close to us. The wind was again howling this morning making the birding very tough. Our last stop of the morning was some ponds near the airport where most of the birds were hiding in the reeds away from the prevailing wind. A few Common Pochard were somewhat obvious and a Common Grasshopper Warbler sang its reeling song from the dense reed-beds. Alas we stood little chance of seeing this! After a somewhat sheltered picnic lunch we spent the rest of the afternoon walking the center of Astana- an amazing, almost bizarre range of architectural styles made for an almost eerie feeling. Dinner was at our hotel in a purple Euro-chic bar……again, somewhat surreal at times.

 

June 2                  Korgalzhyn
An early start this morning with coffee at 5 AM; surprisingly it was already light. Astana is on the 52nd parallel, so early mornings and late evenings are the norm during the summer months. Weather predictions varied from strong winds to passing showers so we had to be prepared for almost any weather – sounds familiar! Our destination this morning was the wide expanses of Korgalzhyn Nature Reserve which is dotted with lakes and home to a huge number of breeding and migrant wetland species. A windy roadside stop along the way produced some great views of Bluethroats (“Red-spotted” form) which were singing from the roadside thickets. Several spectacular Red-footed Falcons sat in the bare trees and a pair of exquisite Demoiselle Cranes fed in a nearby ploughed field. This area of steppe is renowned for its larks and there was barely any time when Black, White-winged or Eurasian Skylark were not in view. Waterfowl were well represented and small numbers of shorebirds were still moving through, with the most impressive being thousands of Red-necked Phalaropes feeding all over the open water. Rain came in soon after we arrived at Korgalzhyn which made for some interesting driving along the slippery mud roads. Thankfully Oscar, our very capable driver, kept us safe for the complete trip and we only had to be gently winched back onto the road once! Other highlights had to be the fly-over of several flocks of Dalmatian Pelicans (last pelican species for several folks), 5 Greater Flamingos (a “lifer” for Sasha, our local guide) and brief views of a Saiga Antelope. One of key-note species of this reserve is the Sociable Lapwing (Plover) but this rare species is always tough to find. Luckily on the way back to Astana, with the help of some Belgian birders, we watched a pair mobbing an immature Imperial Eagle in a large agricultural field. That was a relief!  Returning back to Astana, we discovered that it had rained heavily that day, but the wind had calmed a little. Dinner back in the purple bar was washed down with a local Pilsner – a great day!

 

June 3                  Almaty
6 AM breakfast this morning and off to the airport for our 9 AM flight to Almaty, We all got quite the surprise when Molly appeared, in her work clothes as a flight attendant for Air Astana! She was working our flight as well so we got to chat a little en route to Almaty. It was raining when we got there and the weather seemed to have set in with low clouds and fog from time to time. Our main birding area this afternoon was Ile Alatau National Park in the foothills of the Tien Shan Mountains. A quick walk before the rain set in got us Brown Dipper and Blue Whistling-Thrush – both at the eastern edge of their ranges. The weather must be very rainy here as all of the picnic shelters had roofs; important as the rain had started again. We tried to walk up the muddy road to find the Meadow Bunting, but the conditions were so gluey we decided to abandon the effort. A walk along the road was better with brief views of the lovely Azure Tit, a pair of Gray Wagtails carrying food to their chicks, and an immature Golden Eagle that soared over us to perch on a nearby crag. The fog then rolled in again so we decided to go to the hotel in Almaty. I had forgotten how large the city was and it took us a while to go through the traffic-congested streets to our Bavarian-style hotel. We seemed extra tired tonight so it must have been the combination of weather and travelling that wore us out! Hopefully the weather will improve tomorrow as we drive east towards the yurt camp.

 

June 4                  Yurt Camp
Staying at the yurt camp out in the desert is always one of the highlights of the tour, so we were all looking forward to this unique experience. We drove northwest out of Almaty birding along the way, adding our first Red-headed Buntings, Rosy Starlings and European Rollers of the tour. A slow drive along the shores of Lake Sorbaluq produced large numbers of Ruddy Shelduck, Red-crested Pochard and several beautiful drake Garganey. The dam area has been a breeding spot for a large colony of Rosy Starlings for several years, although the colony varies in numbers from year to year depending on the food supply of grasshoppers. Regardless of the numbers present this year, it was still an impressive sight and offered great photographic opportunities. Lunch was at a very unusual spot – known locally as the “Wishing Tree”. This rather run-down and scruffy area is comprised of an overgrazed and polluted spring, several old trees and an old stock yard – hardly a migration hotspot. But it is and over the years many migrants have been found in this small area – and today both of the trees were full of a baffling number of very confusing Eurasian warblers. We ended up with great views of Syke’s, Paddyfield, Hume’s and Greenish Warblers; a small flock of Demoiselle Cranes gave us a fly-by, but didn’t land and a pair of Pied Wheatears were already feeding some well-grown chicks. I could have stayed for much longer, but we had to continue on to our camp in the desert. A brief stop in a small town was quiet for migrants, but very noisy due to the large colony of Rooks. Birding in the desert is always wonderful, but challenging. Most birds tend to be the same color and can be confusingly difficult to find, let along identify. On our way to the camp we did find Greater Sand-Plover and a small flock of Black-bellied Sandgrouse – a nice start to our desert stay.


June 5                  Yurt Camp and Topar Lakes
One of the toughest birds to see in the desert is the MacQueen’s Bustard. Because of the hunting pressures from the Middle Eastern elite, this and the closely-related Houbara Bustard are declining at a precipitous rate across their ranges. We had an early morning out in the desert before breakfast with great views of flocks of Black-bellied Sandgrouse flying in for their morning drink and a small flock of Greater Sand-Plover on the arid steppes. Caspian Plover are also reported in this area from time to time, but alas we missed them this morning. Calandra Larks were everywhere and Brown-necked Ravens, the more desert-living of the ravens, put in an appearance. Today was our day to visit the Turanga forests a few hours away, as well as to a series of wetlands near the village of Topar. After breakfast our first stop was a nest of Long-legged Buzzards, with House and Spanish Sparrows also living in the nest! A Rufous Bush-Robin was glimpsed by some of us on the way, but most of us never got onto it at all. A stop at Topar Lakes was very profitable with White-headed and Ferruginous Ducks on the shallow lagoons, but our quarry here was a little harder to see. Sasha had heard a Black-headed Penduline-Tit on his last tour but they could never see the bird. We weren’t holding out for much so were very surprised when a male appeared in the reeds in front of us. A lifer for Sasha as well! We found several Saxaul Sparrows nesting at a nearby bus shelter before we had lunch in the nearby woodland. This patch of degraded woodland is home to the critically rare Pale-backed or Yellow-eyed Pigeon. It took a little while, but we ended up with great views, as well as the more widespread White-winged Woodpecker. A full, but amazing day before we got back to our amazing yurt camp.

 

June 6                  Yurt Camp to Almaty
It was time to pack up the camp today and head into Almaty. Actually we were the last group at the camp this year, so as we birded around the area- and finally getting distant views of the bustard, the camp was being dismantled for the season. A nearby village had a few migrants still moving through, including a late Spotted Flycatcher and several Syke’s Warblers. Several very smart-looking Desert Finches were also in the area and European Rollers were downright common at times. We took the long way back to Almaty, driving a road which should have been called “Lark Alley”. I had never seen so many Calandra Larks flying off the road into the surrounding desert brush. At one stage I estimated birds were flying off the road at over 30/minute so our estimate of 500 birds was probably low. A stop at the petroglyphs spot was fascinating, although we missed the Eastern Rock-Nuthatch, probably due to it being so hot late in the day. Thankfully the bird also occurs widely in Uzbekistan, so maybe we will pick it up later in the trip. Dinner was back at the hotel, where it was also good to get a good hot shower after 3 days in the desert.

 

June 7                  Charyn River
We changed habitats today as we drove east towards the dry Sogety Plains and rocky outcroppings of Charyn Canyon. Our first stop was in the agricultural country about an hour out of Almaty. The dense vegetation produced our first Nightingales, along with Indian Golden-Oriole and White-crowned Penduline-Tit. It was a fairly long drive to the Kokpek Canyon so lunch was along the roadside at a site of an abandoned restaurant. The rocky crags and canyons here were home to Chukar, Rock and White-capped Buntings and Blue Rock-Thrush. The Sogety Plains are wide open semi-desert and are perfect for sandgrouse and larks. We spent a couple of hours sitting at a small spring watching the birds come in to drink and bathe. One of our target birds is the Asian Crimson-winged Finch, but despite sitting here for a while, none came into drink. A big flock of Rosy Starlings did come in and give us quite a show allowing us some great photography. Several Gray-necked Buntings also came into drink allowing us great views. The Hunting Cabins at Charyn were relaxed and comfortable. As we were in the middle of nowhere with no restaurants nearby we all ate together in a communal dining room with the hosts cooking great dinners for us. As soon as dusk fell the Scops Owls started calling; a very atmospheric sound in the tall trees surrounding the lodge. It didn’t take long to spotlight a couple and get great views of this endearing small owl.

 

June 8                  Charyn Canyon
A walk along the river in the morning was very pleasant with the Nightingales singing their loud songs from the dense vegetation and Indian Golden-Orioles fluting overhead; a pair of Common Kingfishers flashed their brilliant colors along the river and several delightful Azure Tits called from the canopy. This morning we were going to see the spectacular Charyn Canyon- a spot the locals call their “Grand Canyon” – it’s more of a touristic destination, but also not a bad raptor spot. We had a beautiful Egyptian Vulture sail past us, a Steppe Eagle sat atop a pylon and a Greater Spotted Eagle, the latter quite a rarity in this area. Lunch was along the roadside where a Great “Midday” Gerbil took some bread back into its burrow – quite amusing and a trove of food for the family! It’s just a shame that folks use these beautiful locations as a garbage dump. Our afternoon destination was the water meadows near Kegen, only about 20 km from Kyrgyzstan – we so wanted to add another “stan’ to our list! The rain had been quite heavy, but lessened allowing us to bird from the roadside. A beautiful Citrine Wagtail sat on a wire, along with a Richard's’ Pipit, while a flock of beautiful Demoiselle Cranes fed in a nearby field. A Common Quail heard on the way home was our only one of the trip but was too far down the slope for us to find it.

 

June 9                  Charyn back to Almaty
After a nice breakfast we had to drive back to Almaty. Our first stop was again on the Sogety Plains, where at last we managed a pair of the somewhat tough-to-see Pallas’s Sandgrouse. A pair of German birders were doing Kazakhstan on their own, which must have been quite the challenge, so we helped them out with a few local birding locations. The waterhole was quiet after the rain the previous day, as there must have been lots of available drinking pools throughout the desert. We stopped again at the White-capped Bunting spot and also for Hume’s Whitethroat and a colony of Pale Sand Martins before having a picnic lunch along the roadside where several of the local farmers allowed us to take photos of them and their donkey-drawn carts. An early arrival back into Almaty gave us a chance to stock up on dwindling Scotch supplies and have a rest before dinner.

 

June 10                Big Almaty Lake
A relaxing start to the day today with breakfast at 7 AM followed by a 7:45 AM departure for Ile Alatau National Park and the Big Almaty Lake area. It being a Sunday, there were dozens of day-trippers from Almaty heading into the mountains to enjoy the beautiful weather. Our first and most important stop of the day was to Big Almaty Lake with a quest to find the Ibisbill. Once we had submitted all of our passports and the appropriate paperwork we walked down to the receding lakeshore. Recent rain had made the fringes quite muddy, but thankfully we didn’t have to hike all around the lake as we spotted 2 Ibisbill resting on a mudflat. They were a little distant, but with the scope we all managed to get pretty decent views. Butterflies were also out enjoying the fine weather with several beautiful Small Tortoiseshells nectaring on the abundant flowers. We also walked some of the forest trails beneath a canopy of Tien Shan Spruces – not super rich in birds, but we did see both the Eversmann’s and Blue-capped Redstarts and Coal and Songar Tits. Lunch was back at the Alpen Rose, a very comfortable hotel that was new since my last visit. The afternoon was spent in the meadows around the now military base at the observatory. White-browed Tit-Warblers were active, but elusive, but we all managed great views of Himalayan Rubythroat and Dark-mantled Rosefinch. Rain clouds gathered over the mountains later in the day, but in the evening we still managed to see a roding Eurasian Woodcock and hear the unusual single-note song of the White’s Thrush.

 

June 11                Cosmo Station
A pre-breakfast walk in the spruce forests near the hotel produced excellent views of a Eurasian Nutcracker which snatched a big juicy bug out of the sky only to land on a nearby spruce and give us great photo opportunities!  The morning was high up the mountain looking for Himalayan Snowcock and other birds near the old decaying observatory. Red-billed Choughs were feeding some well-grown chicks and a male Common Redstart seemed somewhat out of habitat. A pair of Wallcreepers flew over very but the birding came to an end when sleet glazed the ground making for a wintry picture with the distant snow-capped peaks. We went back for a big lunch before heading back up for another chance at the Snowcock, but the weather deteriorated before we could see them and sleet thick fog blanketed all but the lower elevations. Another visit to the spruce forest below Big Almaty Lake produced great views of a Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker – a very uncommon bird here. Sasha heard it on the last tour, but they could never see it. After dinner we decided to do some owling – always a challenge. We did eventually hear the Boreal and also a distant Tawny Owl, as well as views of Eurasian Woodcock as it performed its song flight. Late night for some of us!

 

June 12                Back to Almaty
After breakfast the weather looked pretty good so it was time for another attempt for the Himalayan Snowcock.  We again heard them as they called from high above us and eventually we found them way up on the ridgetop – phew! Scope views for all! A Himalayan Griffon flew over us and down the valley as we chatted to Sveta and Vaughan, some other tour leaders from the UK, and they helped us find a singing Himalayan (Altai) Accentor – another one at the last minute.
It was then slowly down the hill and back to the hotel for lunch. We couldn’t find the White-throated Dipper along the river and had to be happy with a Brown Dipper with well-grown chicks. A pair of Blue Whistling-Thrushes flew down the river and a Honey Buzzard glided down the valley, but we couldn’t re-find it to check its true identity. It was then back to Almaty to organize ourselves for our extension to Uzbekistan.

 

June 13                Tashkent
Mother and Chris had arrived in Tashkent a couple of days ahead of us, so were awaiting us at the airport when we landed. Once again the airlines had done their best and Chris’s suitcase was still orbiting an unknown part of planet Earth. It was then straight on the road to the ancient city of Samarkand. We made various stops along the way for a nesting colony of White Storks and a late afternoon snack. As always on these birding trips we eat too much so a snack was perfect. A roadside stop near some cliffs produced a beautiful Lammergeier, 2 Egyptian Vultures and a pair of European Rollers carrying food to a nearby nest hole. Our hotel in Samarkand was right in the center of the city in the shadow of the statue of Tamerlane and a very short walk to the madrasa. Tomorrow is going to be one of the highlights when we have a historic tour of the city.

 

June 14                Samarkand
But it was birding again in the early morning with some fine birds ahead of us. A 5 am start with unfortunately no coffee in sight left a couple of folks without their morning coffee-fix. We drove south to some overgrazed rocky hills where we found our first target bird - Finsch’s Wheatear and some very cooperative Eastern Rock-Nuthatches called and posed on nearby rocks. It was very cool and pleasant to start with as we had breakfast atop a hillside with a Lesser Gray Shrike watching us as we ate. A Hume’s Lark sang its distinctive song overhead as we walked down the rocky gorge looking for our next target bird – the very range-restricted white-throated Robin. It took us a while, but we ended up with incredible views of both the male and female carrying food to their nest – awesome! A brief stop at a children’s camp was a stake-out spot for a pair of nesting Indian Paradise-Flycatchers – seemed so out of place here in the semi-desert situation. It was back to Samarqand for lunch of the national dish – a traditional Plov, which is a dish of rice and vegetables with beef.  The afternoon was spent having a guided tour of the city’s ancient sites.  The beauty and dramatic architecture was spectacular, but was almost overwhelming. Renovation and repair seems to be ongoing and the future for tourism seems to be excellent. Our hotel was very convenient and allowed us to walk to many of the local historic sites. Dinner was at a restaurant in the center of the city where we enjoyed our meal with a fine mist and a sea of plastic flowers!  As always we did our daily birdlist after dinner at the hotel, but tonight it was atop the roof overlooking part of the ancient city of Samarkand – quite magnificent!

 

June 15                Samarkand to Bukhara
Despite being in the deserts, Samarkand is surprisingly habitat-diverse. This morning we headed to the wetlands and riparian woodland along the Zerevshan River. Turanga trees and Tamarisk are some of the dominant species in this habitat, but overall it was fairly quiet. A pair of Shikra was probably nesting near the entrance as they were flying around noisily. It was fascinating seeing the herd of Bactrian/Bukhara Deer as well. Apparently these rare race of Red Deer were down to 400 individuals in 1999 and 20 years later the wild herds have grown to over 1400 – a good conservation story. A real surprise was a Long-eared Owl that was being harassed by Magpies and was flying around the deer enclosure! It was then off to Bukhara and farther along the famed Silk Road. The habitat got drier and drier as we approached the very severe and Soviet city of Navoiy. Thankfully we bypassed the main part of town on our way towards Lake Todokal. A stop in the marshes on the way (thanks Kay!) produced White-tailed Lapwing, Collared Pratincole and some beautiful Citrine Wagtails – this time of the black-backed race. Lake Todokal was quite breezy which resulted in the gulls and terns all being pushed into one corner to feed. We arrived in Bukhara tired and ready for an early night, but the hotel had prepared a huge meal for us……..

 

June 16                Bukhara
After a long day of travel….what did we need but an early start? Thankfully we could grab a pillow and blanket from the hotel and sleep in the van on our way to the desert. Some birds are worth the time and effort and we were after the amazing and almost endemic Pander’s Ground-Jay. Once we reached the correct spot, it only took 5 minutes to find the bird (thanks Ron) and we watched this very unusual bird walking around the dunes probing for insects below the sand. Other birds in the area included Scrub Warbler and the Steppe race of the Southern Gray Shrike. Yes it was a long way back to Bukhara, but we were back in time for lunch and spent the rest of the afternoon exploring the city. We didn’t have a guided tour of the city, but just all explored independently, shopped a little and tried to stay out of the hot sun! Again we were staying in the center of the city, so it was easy to get to all of the great historic sight and to enjoy them at our own pace. We only realized that most of the local people come out after dusk when the heat finally subsides. Those of us who ventured out after dinner were shocked and surprised when all of the restaurants and cafes were packed; there was live music and people shopping – quite the contrast to the middle of the day!

 

June 17                Tashkent
We had a slight change of plans today and took the early flight to Tashkent. Breakfast was upon arrival before birding along the Chirchiq River. This was once a tranquil attractive place, but is now a quarry and dumping ground for industrial materials. Despite the somewhat grim surroundings, the river had a nice selection of birds, including Black-crowned Night-Heron, White-crowned Penduline-Tit and good numbers of Pygmy Cormorants. We spent the rest of the day exploring up and down the river- which could be an awesome nature reserve although it would take a lot of clean-up Including the bags of sheep-bits – ugh! Marsh Harriers, Common Cuckoos and Clamorous Reed-Warblers were ubiquitous, and I am sure that crakes, bitterns and more are probably widespread during the correct seasons.

 

June 18                Tashkent and Chimgan Hills
About 1.5 hours away from Tashkent are the Chimgan Hills, part of the foothills of the Tien Shan Mountains on the border with both Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. Snow-capped mountains are always in view with spruce cloaking the higher elevations. We couldn’t get into the high mountains with some major hiking, but the birding wasn’t bad in the middle elevations. A Hawfinch was hiding in the grass when we arrived but disappeared when we were not looking! We had a few fly-overs, but no more close-ups. Our target bird here was the Rufous-naped or Black-breasted Tit and we had great views of a family group on the way up, along with Azure and Great (Turkestan) Tits. A walk up into the mountain meadows produced several singing White-capped Buntings amidst a colorful palate of wildflowers. This was quite the show and included some very large Foxtail lilies. A very enjoyable coffee break was taken on the porch of the local hotel where House Martins nested over our heads. We made a couple more stops along the Chirchiq River on our way back to Tashkent. Dinner was excellent that night, along with belly-dancers (the less said the better!!) and washed down with a rather nice red wine.

 

June 19                Tashkent
A slight change of plans our last day and an outside chance to look for a Pallid Scops-Owl. Yes, this required another early start and a bit more sleep in the van before we arrived at a somewhat dusty patch of woodland. We searched every patch of that forest, but not a peep or a hoot from an owl of any species was heard. There were plenty of Magpies and a couple of White-winged Woodpeckers and a walk to the nearby river produced a Mink (probably American I believe due to escaped animals). We spent the afternoon doing a little exploration of Tashkent, visiting the local fruit and vegetable market where we bought dried fruit and spices and spent an hour or so at the local museum. Despite not knowing the language, it was a good insight into the country from the past to the present. Our farewell dinner was at a very ornate restaurant in Tashkent. The food overall has been very good, but some strange twists included bunches of herbs (cilantro and dill) – a very “de-constructed” salad! After some dancing it was off to the airport for our late night flight to Astana and home.

I think we were all surprised by Uzbekistan – modern cities with great hotels and food. The people were very friendly and we were asked for photos on multiple occasions. Considering that migration was over and many of the transient birds were already on their breeding grounds we had a very good selection of breeding species, including the enigmatic Pander’s Ground-Jay. Tashkent was surprisingly modern, but then the 1966 earthquake leveled the city. The ancient cities of Samarkand were also very modern with the historic buildings being in the very centers. The grandeur and colors were magnificent and mixing some of these historic sites with the birding was a perfect combination.

   

Simon Thompson 

Birds and wildlife seen on our Venture to
Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan:

June 1- 20, 2018

 

 

Kazakhstan

 

Graylag Goose
Mute Swan
Whooper Swan
Ruddy Shelduck
Common Shelduck
Garganey
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
Eurasian Wigeon
Mallard
Northern Pintail
Red-crested Pochard
Common Pochard
Ferruginous Pochard
Tufted Duck
Common Goldeneye
White-headed Duck
Common Quail (H)
Chukar
Himalayan Snowcock
Ring-necked Pheasant
Great Crested Grebe
Black-necked (Eared) Grebe
Greater Flamingo
Pygmy Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Great White Pelican
Dalmatian Pelican
Gray Heron
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Lammergeier
Egyptian Vulture
European Honey-buzzard
Himalayan Griffon
Cinereous Vulture
Short-toed Snake-Eagle
Greater Spotted Eagle
Booted Eagle
Steppe Eagle
Imperial Eagle
Golden Eagle
Eurasian Marsh Harrier
Hen Harrier
Pallid Harrier
Montagu's Harrier
Shikra
Eurasian Sparrowhawk
Black Kite
Eurasian Buzzard
Long-legged Buzzard
Macqueen's Bustard
Common Moorhen
European Coot
Demoiselle Crane
Common Crane
European Thick-knee
Black-winged Stilt
Pied Avocet
Ibisbill
Black-bellied Plover
Northern Lapwing
Sociable Lapwing
Greater Sand Plover
Kentish Plover
Little Ringed Plover
Eurasian Curlew
Curlew Sandpiper
Dunlin
Little Stint
Terek Sandpiper

Red-necked Phalarope

 

Common Sandpiper
Marsh Sandpiper
Common Redshank
Black-winged Pratincole
Slender-billed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Pallas's Gull
Caspian Gull
Black Tern
White-winged Tern
Common Tern
Pallas's Sandgrouse
Black-bellied Sandgrouse
Rock Pigeon
Pale-backed Pigeon
Common Wood-Pigeon
European Turtle-Dove
Oriental Turtle-Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Common Cuckoo
European Scops-Owl
Little Owl
Tawny Owl (H)
Boreal Owl (H)
Alpine Swift
Common Swift
Eurasian Hoopoe
Common Kingfisher
European Bee-eater
European Roller
Great Spotted Woodpecker
White-winged Woodpecker
Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker
Lesser Kestrel
Eurasian Kestrel
Red-footed Falcon
Eurasian Hobby
Red-tailed (Turkestan) Shrike
Long-tailed Shrike
Southern Grey Shrike
Lesser Grey Shrike
Indian Golden Oriole
Eurasian Magpie
Spotted Nutcracker
Red-billed Chough
Yellow-billed Chough
Eurasian Jackdaw
Rook
Carrion Crow
Hooded Crow
Brown-necked Raven
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Greater Short-toed Lark
Bimaculated Lark
Calandra Lark
Black Lark
Asian Short-toed Lark
White-winged Lark
Eurasian Skylark
Crested Lark
Sand Martin (Bank Swallow)
Pale Martin
Barn Swallow
Red-rumped Swallow
Common House-Martin
Coal Tit
Willow (Songar) Tit
Azure Tit
Great Tit
Great (Turkestan) Tit

Black-headed Penduline-Tit

White-crowned Penduline-Tit
White-browed Tit-Warbler

 

Eurasian Wren
Brown Dipper
Goldcrest
Cetti's Warbler (H)
Common (Siberian) Chiffchaff
Sulphur-bellied Warbler
Hume's Warbler
Greenish Warbler
Booted Warbler
Sykes’ Warbler
Olivaceous Warbler
Paddyfield Warbler
Blyth's Reed Warbler
Great Reed Warbler (H)
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Grasshopper Warbler (H)
Asian Desert Warbler
Hume’s Whitethroat
Lesser Whitethroat
Common Whitethroat
Spotted Flycatcher
Rufous-tailed Scrub-Robin
Common Nightingale
Bluethroat
Blue Whistling-Thrush
Himalayan Rubythroat
Rufous-backed Redstart
Blue-capped Redstart
Common Redstart
White-winged Redstart
Rufous-tailed Rock-Thrush
Blue Rock-Thrush
Siberian Stonechat
Northern Wheatear
Pied Wheatear
Desert Wheatear
Isabelline Wheatear
White’s Thrush (H)
Eurasian Blackbird
Fieldfare
Mistle Thrush
European Starling
Rosy Starling
Common Myna
Himalayan Accentor
Brown Accentor
Black-throated Accentor
Western Yellow Wagtail (race: beema)
Citrine Wagtail
Grey Wagtail
White Wagtail (personata)
Richard’s Pipit
Tawny Pipit
Tree Pipit
Water Pipit
Pine Bunting
Rock Bunting
Gray-necked Bunting
Chestnut-breasted Bunting
Red-headed Bunting
Corn Bunting
White-winged Grosbeak
Common Rosefinch
Red-mantled Rosefinch
Mongolian Finch
Plain Mountain-Finch
Desert Finch
Eurasian Linnet
European Goldfinch
Fire-fronted Serin
Saxaul Sparrow
House Sparrow
Spanish Sparrow
Eurasian Tree Sparrow

Rock Petronia

 

Mammals:

Bobak (Steppe) Marmot
Gray Marmot
Yellow Ground-Squirrel
Pygmy Jerboa sp.
Great Gerbil
European (Brown) Hare
Tolai Hare
Corsac (Steppe) Fox
Red Fox
Beech Marten (DOR)
Goitered Gazelle
Saiga Antelope
Golden Jackal

Muskrat (Introduced)

 

 

 

Reptiles and Amphibians:

Russian Tortoise
Steppe Agama
Toad-headed Agama

 

 

Uzbekistan

 

 

Red-crested Pochard
Little Grebe
White Stork
Pygmy Cormorant
Great Cormorant
Gray Heron
Purple Heron
Little Egret
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Lammergeier
Egyptian Vulture
Eurasian Griffon
Booted Eagle
Eurasian Marsh Harrier
Shikra
Long-legged Buzzard
Eurasian Moorhen
Eurasian Coot
Black-winged Stilt
White-tailed Plover
Kentish Plover
Little Ringed Plover
Common Sandpiper
Marsh Sandpiper
Wood Sandpiper
Collared Pratincole
Slender-billed Gull
Black-headed Gull
Caspian Gull
Little Tern
Caspian Tern
Common Tern
Black-bellied Sandgrouse
Rock Pigeon
Common Wood-Pigeon

European Turtle-Dove

Oriental Turtle-Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Laughing Dove
Common Cuckoo
Long-eared Owl
Alpine Swift
Common Swift
Eurasian Hoopoe
Common Kingfisher
Blue-cheeked Bee-eater
European Bee-eater
European Roller
White-winged Woodpecker
Eurasian Kestrel
Eurasian Hobby
Red-tailed (Turkestan) Shrike
Long-tailed Shrike
Southern Grey Shrike
Lesser Grey Shrike
Indian Golden Oriole
Eurasian Magpie
Turkestan (Pander’s) Ground-Jay
Eurasian Jackdaw
Rook
Carrion Crow
Common Raven
Hume’s Lark
Oriental Skylark
Crested Lark
Sand Martin (Bank Swallow)
Pale Martin
Eurasian Crag Martin
Barn Swallow
Red-rumped Swallow
Common House-Martin

Black-breasted Tit

Yellow-breasted (Azure) Tit
Great (Turkestan) Tit
White-crowned Penduline-Tit
Eastern Rock Nuthatch
Scrub Warbler
Olivaceous Warbler
European Reed Warbler
Clamorous Reed Warbler
Hume’s Whitethroat
Eastern Orphean Warbler
Spotted Flycatcher
White-throated Robin
Common Nightingale
Blue Whistling-Thrush
Blue Rock-Thrush
Pied Bushchat
Finsch’s Wheatear
Pied Wheatear
Isabelline Wheatear
Eurasian Blackbird
Mistle Thrush
European Starling
Rosy Starling
Common Myna
Western Yellow Wagtail
Citrine Wagtail
Gray Wagtail
White Wagtail
Rock Bunting
Chestnut-breasted Bunting
Red-headed Bunting
Hawfinch
European Greenfinch
House Sparrow
Spanish Sparrow
Eurasian Tree Sparrow
Rock Petronia

Mammals:

Yellow Ground-Squirrel
Red (Bukhara) Deer
Red Fox
American Mink

 

 

 

Reptiles and Amphibians:

Turkestan Rock Agama
Reticulate Racerunner
Toad-headed Agama
Tessellated Water Snake
Marsh Frog (?)